Changing the Meat-Heavy Diet Could Add up to 13 Years More To Your Life

The researchers found that eating a healthier diet could increase life expectancy by up to 1.9 years for a man and 1.6 years for a woman. But they also found that these life-extending benefits only applied to people who were eating a healthy diet, as opposed to those who ate a poor diet

Changing the Meat-Heavy Diet Could Add up to 13 Years More To Your Life

The researchers found that eating a healthier diet could increase life expectancy by up to 1.9 years for a man and 1.6 years for a woman. But they also found that these life-extending benefits only applied to people who were eating a healthy diet, as opposed to those who ate a poor diet

Results show that a healthier diet in general will contribute to longer life, but the biggest benefits are seen in young adults.

“The data from our study show that reducing the intake of processed meat and red meat can contribute to an extra 4 years of life. We have also found that the positive effects are greater in younger adults than in older adults,” a team from the University of Bergen, researcher Lars Fadnes said. “For the younger adults, reducing the intake of processed meat and red meat can contribute to an extra 10 years of life.

Their study was not based on any long-term dietary guidelines, but on a model that combines dietary factors, age, and a person’s current health.

The researchers found that eating a healthier diet could increase life expectancy by up to 1.9 years for a man and 1.6 years for a woman. But they also found that these life-extending benefits only applied to people who were eating a healthy diet, as opposed to those who ate a poor diet.

“We found that for people who were already eating a healthy diet, the benefits of switching to a healthier diet are substantial.

When the researchers looked at the study participants, they found that they were at a higher risk of death if they consumed a diet high in processed meat, such as bacon and sausages, red meat, and hot dogs. But the researchers say that switching to a healthier diet could help to save more years of life than other lifestyle choices, like smoking or drinking.

This isn’t the first study to find that a healthy diet is good for your health.

If young adults in the United States move away from the traditional Western diet and start eating more healthy options, they’ll add more than a decade to their life expectancy.

“Understanding the relative health potential of different food groups could enable people to make feasible and significant health gains,” the study authors say in a media release.

It’s not all bad news, though.

So, what does this all mean?

The study was a huge success, and I think it highlights a really important point. If we’re going to focus on the importance of lifestyle, and we’re going to focus on health, we’re going to need to start looking at the food that we’re eating, and we’re going to need to look at the way that we’re living.

It’s so important to take control of our health, and to take control of our lifestyle. It’s so important to eat well, and to live well. It’s so important to take control of our health.

Nuts and legumes gives the biggest boost

Eating more legumes (such as beans and peas) added more than two years of life to young adults, while whole grains and nuts also boosted life expectancy by similar amounts. Eating less red meat also contributed to this healthy shift, adding 1.6 years to a woman’s lifespan and 1.9 years to a man’s average life expectancy. The results were exactly the same when adults gave up processed meat at a young age.

People over 60 can make a big difference in their health by making simple changes in their diet. Women can expect to live about eight years longer, and men 8.8 years longer if they make the switch from a Western diet to an optimized healthy diet.

Even men and women above 80 years, they can gain an extra 3.4 years of life on average.

The findings are published in the reputable medical journal PLOS Medicine.

Allie Leon, Chief Fun Officer

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